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Buspar


Buspar is a trade name for buspirone, a drug used to treat Generalized Anxiety Disorder and sometimes depression.....
Buspar is a trade name for buspirone, a drug used to treat Generalized Anxiety Disorder and sometimes depression. It has also shown promise in helping patients recovering from traumatic brain injuries to improve their spatial learning and memory.

The chemical structure of buspirone is completely different from those in the benzodiazepine family, such as Valium, and therefore BuSpar shows very little risk for tolerance, dependence or addiction.


Also, there appears to be no withdrawal effects of sudden discontinuance of the use of Buspar.


Alternative & street names:

Buspar is now available as a generic buspirone prescription. No known street names.

In addition to Buspar, buspirone is also available as Ansial, Ansiced, Anxiron, Axoren, Bespar, Buspimen, Buspinol, Buspiron, Buspisal, Narol, Spamilan, Spitomin and Sorbon.


How is Buspar taken?

Buspar is taken orally as a tablet, usually 2 or 3 times per day.


Effects of Buspar consumption

Patients may take Buspar with or without food, but it is recommended that they remain consistent. Also, one should not drink an abundance of grapefruit juice while taking Buspar, as grapefruit juice increases the plasma concentration of buspirone.

Unlike other anti-anxiety drugs, it takes a week or two for Buspar’s sedative effects to take hold.


Impact on the mind/body and health risks

Buspirone may cause side effects, such as:

drowsiness
upset stomach
vomiting
constipation
diarrhea
stomach pain
headache
dry mouth
depression
excitement
fatigue
nervousness
difficulty sleeping
lightheadedness
weakness
numbness


If more severe side effects occur, patients should call their doctors immediately. Those more severe side effects include:

· skin rash

· itching

· fast or irregular heartbeat

· blurred vision

· unusual movements of the head or neck muscles


Signs of abuse of this substance

While many claim that Buspar is not addictive, some doctors disagree. Like all tranquilizers, they argue, Buspar can be habit forming and addictive with life-threatening neurological consequences.


Common treatment options

Even patients who are not physically dependent on Buspar may develop a psychological dependence to it, necessitating that ending the use of Buspar should be supervised by a doctor, and also possibly an addiction psychiatrist in a 24/7 detox facility.

In a rehab facility, patients can learn to function without the drug in their systems.

If discontinued abruptly, patients may have withdrawal symptoms, and they risk damage to internal organs if they stop using the drug without supervision.


Buspar withdrawal/detox symptoms

Major symptoms of Buspar withdrawal include:

Aches and pains
Agoraphobia
Anxiety
Blurred Vision
Body Vibrations
Diarrhea
Flu-like symptoms
Hair loss
Heart palpitations
Heavy limbs
Insomnia
Lethargy
Loss of balance
Metallic taste
Muscle spasms
Nightmares
Panic attacks
Sweating
Suicidal thoughts



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